Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to uv radiation

Sekelj, Maja (2014) Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to uv radiation. Bachelor's thesis, Faculty of Science > Department of Biology.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only
Language: Croatian

Download (254kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Pigmentation of human skin is the result of natural selection, which took place under the influence of two factors. In areas of high UV radiation, near the equator, dark pigmentation has developed to protect folate, while the evolution of depigmented skin occured in areas with low UV radiation because of the need to maintain the production of vitamin D. The importance of preservation of folic acid and vitamin D production itself in the human body is huge. Between the equator and the poles, between 23 and 46 degrees of latitude, there evolved humans with constitutive pigmentation of tanable skin. Tanning or facultative pigmentation is a great evolutionary compromise because when the intensity of UVB radiation is low, the skin remains of lighter pigmentation so it could produce vitamin D under such conditions, and as intensity of UVB radiation is getting higher, tan is getting darker so it could protect folate acid from photolysis caused by UV radiation. Pigmentation of human skin is one of the best examples of evolution by natural selection and it is the perfect model for learning and understanding it.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's thesis)
Supervisor: Galov, Ana
Date: 2014
Number of Pages: 14
Subjects: NATURAL SCIENCES > Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Science > Department of Biology
Depositing User: Grozdana Sirotic
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2014 13:03
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2014 10:08
URI: http://digre.pmf.unizg.hr/id/eprint/791

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Nema podataka za dohvacanje citata